Conartist*

nymoon:

Remapped
Hurricane marks the beginning of a vulnerable era
by Editors of the Moon, Illustration by John Lee
On October 29, Earth’s full moon brought tides to their highest levels in New York harbor.
Fatefully, on the same evening, a tropical cyclone, Sandy, slammed into the coast. Hard rain and 80mph wind pushed the churning East River over its banks, inundating the canyons of downtown Manhattan, The Rockaways, Staten island, Red Hook, and Coney Island.
In 24 hours, the city remapped itself. Drowned subways returned to primordial underground waterways, prompting the MTA to issue revised maps of a disturbing new topography. The dark-zone of lower Manhattan stood dully against the light of the city, its precincts emptied out. New neighborhoods emerged in evacuation centers. Overnight, the seamless flow of people, capital, and information faced the isolated reality of island geography.
At worst, these dislocations have had mournful consequences: businesses, homes, people were erased in the flood. Thousands in Brooklyn and Staten island are still without power, even as Manhattan shudders back to life. Yet, we recognize that dislocation also reframes, challenging our understanding of the old condition.
We urge our readers to help with the effort not just to return, but to renew and rethink this city’s way of life in what is likely to be a new era of extreme weather:Donate to the Red CrossVolunteer through Occupy Sandy
Nov 6

nymoon:

Remapped

Hurricane marks the
beginning of a vulnerable era

On October 29, Earth’s full moon brought tides to their highest levels in New York harbor.

Fatefully, on the same evening, a tropical cyclone, Sandy, slammed into the coast. Hard rain and 80mph wind pushed the churning East River over its banks, inundating the canyons of downtown Manhattan, The Rockaways, Staten island, Red Hook, and Coney Island.

In 24 hours, the city remapped itself. Drowned subways returned to primordial underground waterways, prompting the MTA to issue revised maps of a disturbing new topography. The dark-zone of lower Manhattan stood dully against the light of the city, its precincts emptied out. New neighborhoods emerged in evacuation centers. Overnight, the seamless flow of people, capital, and information faced the isolated reality of island geography.

At worst, these dislocations have had mournful consequences: businesses, homes, people were erased in the flood. Thousands in Brooklyn and Staten island are still without power, even as Manhattan shudders back to life. Yet, we recognize that dislocation also reframes, challenging our understanding of the old condition.

We urge our readers to help with the effort not just to return, but to renew and rethink this city’s way of life in what is likely to be a new era of extreme weather:

Donate to the Red Cross
Volunteer through Occupy Sandy

Nov 6

(Source: tumblropenarts)

election:

THIS IS IT.
Today, we ask you to take 3 simple steps:
Using the Our Time tool in the footer of this page, PLEDGE to vote and LOOK UP your polling place and local ballot lineup.
Get your ass to a polling place and VOTE like your future depends on it (if you haven’t already). In 10 states you can even register to vote AT your polling place - so if you’re in ID, IA, ME, MN, MT, NH, RI, DC, WI, or WY, you really have no reason not to get out there today!
Post a photo of yourself sporting an “I voted” sticker or in any other way congratulating yourself for being a good citizen today - and tag it #GPOTV (yes, that’s GPOY + GOTV).
Then you are free to sit back and follow the developments here, here, here, and here. 
Thank you, from all of us at Tumblr.
(GIF by Chris DeLorenzo via govote)

hehe
Nov 6

election:

THIS IS IT.

Today, we ask you to take 3 simple steps:

  1. Using the Our Time tool in the footer of this page, PLEDGE to vote and LOOK UP your polling place and local ballot lineup.
  2. Get your ass to a polling place and VOTE like your future depends on it (if you haven’t already). In 10 states you can even register to vote AT your polling place - so if you’re in ID, IA, ME, MN, MT, NH, RI, DC, WI, or WY, you really have no reason not to get out there today!
  3. Post a photo of yourself sporting an “I voted” sticker or in any other way congratulating yourself for being a good citizen today - and tag it #GPOTV (yes, that’s GPOY + GOTV).

Then you are free to sit back and follow the developments hereherehere, and here

Thank you, from all of us at Tumblr.

(GIF by Chris DeLorenzo via govote)

hehe

(Source: gov)

Nov 6
deadpaint:

Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Portrait of Comtesse Adèle-Zoé de Toulouse-Lautrec (Mother of the Painter)

nice
Sep 23

deadpaint:

Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Portrait of Comtesse Adèle-Zoé de Toulouse-Lautrec (Mother of the Painter)

nice

superamit:

One year ago today my doctor called me in the afternoon.

I was in bed. He cleared his throat a couple times and then he told me the reason I’d been feeling weak, seeing weird blindingly bright spots in my vision, and had a fever that wouldn’t go away was because my blood was full of ineffective, malformed white blood cells.

I had AML leukemia. If I did nothing, I’d die in a few weeks. 

A few hours later, I had a flight to the East Coast booked for early the next morning. I spent the night in a San Francisco hospital getting blood transfusions and antibiotics to allow me to fly.

I landed in NYC, my parents picked me up, and we drove to Yale’s Smilow Cancer Hospital. When they started pumping cell-killing poison into my bloodstream, the hospital became my home and my prison for the next few months.

I cried. I felt sorry for myself. I didn’t believe it was true.

Friends banded together and started drives across the country, then across the globe. I did interview after interview. Newspapers, TV, and radio helped spread the word. Facebook, twitter, and tumblr got people to drives. I couldn’t leave the hospital, and sometimes I was throwing up too much or too weak to talk. We kept going.

We organized online, and my prison became our stem cell drive campaign headquarters.

Friends donated time, money, connections. Strangers sent mail, hundreds of photos, and organized drives. Celebrities made videos. Tens of thousands registered to be stem cell donors. (Matches for others in need continue to come out of those drives.)

The nurses and doctors continued to pump poison into my blood, eliminating cancerous cells and healthy cells alike. They hoped to hold the leukemia at bay until a donor could be found.

A few months later, we found a donor! Friends and strangers had banded together to save my life.

 I had my transplant in late January. And then began the year-long recovery process I’m currently in:

15-20 pills a day, on-and-off steroids to combat Graft vs Host Disease, nausea, weakness, muscle atrophy, scopes down my throat, probes up my nose until they hit my throat. Weekly, then bi-monthly blood tests, immunosuppressants - which keep my immune system from attacking my organs, but also make me susceptible to disease. Needles, needles, needles, so many needles, fevers, infections, severe mucositis, so much pain they gave me a button to press to give myself morphine whenever I wanted, anti-nausea drugs that resulted in weeks of lost memories, blood clots, followed by months of blood thinners, teeth issues, corneal damage, a slate of other issues a little too graphic to write about, crazy painful out-of-nowhere hand and leg cramps…

…all bumps along the road.

My counts are up. There’s no sign of recurrence yet. If I’m lucky, there never will be. I feel more normal with each passing week.

I was able to leave the hospital, and then able to leave my parents’ home.

I got to spend the summer in NYC, reconnecting with old friends, and returning to work at Photojojo part-time. I just saw my brother get married, saw a live volcano in Hawaii, saw the sun set above the clouds and the clearest night sky in the world. I visited Portland for the first time, and spent a week in SF working and seeing friends. Now we’re planning a road trip to move back West. We leave in a few weeks… on motorcycles.

A year ago I was on a plane from SF to CT because I was dying.

Today I’m on a plane from SF to CT, and I feel more alive than I have in a very long time.

Photo @ Twin Peaks last week in SF. (You can see photos of our adventures by following @superamit on Instagram!)
Sep 23

superamit:

One year ago today my doctor called me in the afternoon.

I was in bed. He cleared his throat a couple times and then he told me the reason I’d been feeling weak, seeing weird blindingly bright spots in my vision, and had a fever that wouldn’t go away was because my blood was full of ineffective, malformed white blood cells.

I had AML leukemia. If I did nothing, I’d die in a few weeks.

A few hours later, I had a flight to the East Coast booked for early the next morning. I spent the night in a San Francisco hospital getting blood transfusions and antibiotics to allow me to fly.

I landed in NYC, my parents picked me up, and we drove to Yale’s Smilow Cancer Hospital. When they started pumping cell-killing poison into my bloodstream, the hospital became my home and my prison for the next few months.

I cried. I felt sorry for myself. I didn’t believe it was true.

Friends banded together and started drives across the country, then across the globe. I did interview after interview. Newspapers, TV, and radio helped spread the word. Facebook, twitter, and tumblr got people to drives. I couldn’t leave the hospital, and sometimes I was throwing up too much or too weak to talk. We kept going.

We organized online, and my prison became our stem cell drive campaign headquarters.

Friends donated time, money, connections. Strangers sent mail, hundreds of photos, and organized drives. Celebrities made videos. Tens of thousands registered to be stem cell donors. (Matches for others in need continue to come out of those drives.)

The nurses and doctors continued to pump poison into my blood, eliminating cancerous cells and healthy cells alike. They hoped to hold the leukemia at bay until a donor could be found.

A few months later, we found a donor! Friends and strangers had banded together to save my life.

I had my transplant in late January. And then began the year-long recovery process I’m currently in:

15-20 pills a day, on-and-off steroids to combat Graft vs Host Disease, nausea, weakness, muscle atrophy, scopes down my throat, probes up my nose until they hit my throat. Weekly, then bi-monthly blood tests, immunosuppressants - which keep my immune system from attacking my organs, but also make me susceptible to disease. Needles, needles, needles, so many needles, fevers, infections, severe mucositis, so much pain they gave me a button to press to give myself morphine whenever I wanted, anti-nausea drugs that resulted in weeks of lost memories, blood clots, followed by months of blood thinners, teeth issues, corneal damage, a slate of other issues a little too graphic to write about, crazy painful out-of-nowhere hand and leg cramps…

…all bumps along the road.

My counts are up. There’s no sign of recurrence yet. If I’m lucky, there never will be. I feel more normal with each passing week.

I was able to leave the hospital, and then able to leave my parents’ home.

I got to spend the summer in NYC, reconnecting with old friends, and returning to work at Photojojo part-time. I just saw my brother get married, saw a live volcano in Hawaii, saw the sun set above the clouds and the clearest night sky in the world. I visited Portland for the first time, and spent a week in SF working and seeing friends. Now we’re planning a road trip to move back West. We leave in a few weeks… on motorcycles.

A year ago I was on a plane from SF to CT because I was dying.

Today I’m on a plane from SF to CT, and I feel more alive than I have in a very long time.

Photo @ Twin Peaks last week in SF. (You can see photos of our adventures by following @superamit on Instagram!)

samaralex:

Tiny by Sue Demetriou

?
Sep 23

samaralex:

Tiny by Sue Demetriou

?

(via hiddenlex)

Sep 11

samaralex:

Paul Goldstein

(via hiddenlex)

thekhooll:

Let’s Get Organized
By Christopher David Ryan… a graphic artist, illustrator, daydreamer, pseudo-scientist, wanna-be astronaut and untrained intellectual.
Sep 11

thekhooll:

Let’s Get Organized

By Christopher David Ryan… a graphic artist, illustrator, daydreamer, pseudo-scientist, wanna-be astronaut and untrained intellectual.

(via particleb0red)

urbanemenswear:

Viktori, 19

“All my clothes are from Fida thrift stores.
The 50s, the 60s and Johnny Depp in the movie Public Enemies inspire me.”
Aug 28

urbanemenswear:

Viktori, 19

“All my clothes are from Fida thrift stores.

The 50s, the 60s and Johnny Depp in the movie Public Enemies inspire me.”

(via particleb0red)